The Czech undercover police agents: Revealed

  • April 30, 2016 10:25 AM

AntiFenix: The very first court hearing since the Fenix started take a place in Prague city court on April 26-27th 2016. The court is about the case of Igor Shevcov. An anarchist accused of fabricated attack on the house of minister of defense. Igor already had spent 3 months in remand and since September 2015 he has been out on probation.
Three of the anarchists who are currently being held in custody, where they wait for a court decision on whether they will be granted bail or remain on remand, were together with other individuals to attend meetings in the “conspiracy” flat according to the police version. Police claimed they should have been planning an attack on a train carrying military material or Hyundai cars and the alleged attack was to be carried out under the auspices of the Network of Revolutionary Cells. Prosecuted individuals are being accused by investigators of active participation on preparation and testing of incendiary devices (Molotov cocktails) intended for that purpose. The are also accused of participation in the logistics of the attack itself. The accused comrades however, rejected the police version and pointed out the ridiculousness of the claim itself, that someone would try to ignite a train made of steel using Molotov cocktails.
Let’s now focus on the important facts. The flat where the alleged terrorist group meetings should have taken place is no “conspiracy” safe house but merely a regular apartment where several people (some of them connected to the anarchist movement) lived. The decision to live together came from necessity of sharing to reduce living costs not from intentions to conspire. Shared housing is a perfectly normal thing, today and definitely not just among anarchists.
The flat occupancy was not the subject of secrets and that is most likely why it was so easy for undercover police to “infiltrate” the group. Activist meetings organised at the apartment (preparation of activities such as fundraisers, public meetings, cooking for homeless people) were also not a subject of any excessive safety measures and such activities can hardly be categorized as terrorism. It was the undercover police agents who were always trying to radicalise the issues and talked about the necessity to do “something more” than just peacefully protest.
The agents were constantly trying to persuade others that sticking up posters is irrelevant and that action should radicalise. These challenges were usually accompanied by swagger about their previous activities. Imprisoned comrades who were in touch with the undercover operatives also indicated that the idea to attack the train came from agents themselves, without anyone else being actively involved in the development of the plan.
One of the detainees Martin I. wrote:
“Operation Phoenix” is a provocation initiated by undercover police agents with the purpose of drag people into it and then put the blame on the for organising the whole thing. I suspect that the police and investigators are manipulating with the evidence. They think we will plead guilty but our confession would represent just mere lie and we can not allow this to happen! It is interesting how one can become a victim of repressions through arranged undercover operations. The police orchestrated everything to blame us with a very clear intentions to involve many people. They wanted to have terrorism case so they created it.

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